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Brazilian photographer, Alice Kohler, have travelled to 20 different countries in the span of her career. In her own country Brazil, she has reached the remotest parts located at the Amazon basin. She was also able to spend some time with different indigenous people that are still living in the country. These include Kayapo, Yawalapiti, Guarani, Arawete, Parakana, Karaja, Xavante, Asurini, Pareci, Kamaiura, Kuikuro and Pareci.

Cusco in Peru, a neighbor of Brazil, will be holding an exhibit of the photographs taken by Kohler during her time with the Arawete. The exhibition will be held at the gallery owned by a company in Peru called Xapiri. The gallery recently opened and has an Amazon theme. This exhibition is a campaign coming from the partnership between Xapiri and Kohler in order to show the world what the negative impact of the Belo Monte dap complex is to the Arawete and other tribes. Belo Monte is popular globally as the most opposed hydroelectric power project in the world. This project has gathered a lot of oppositions. Add the fact that the company of Belo Sun Mining is also planning to open the largest open sky gold mine in Brazil.

The tribe of Arawete is currently residing at the state of Para specifically in the Xingu basin. They have made contact with civilization after their land was opened by the TransAmazon Highway, a part of the project called BR-230 which is funded by World Bank as well as the Inter-American Development Bank. This event eventually led to a demographic catastrophe resulting to one-thirds of the tribe to pass away. The current population has increased since the contact but according to Kohler, another threat is facing them – ethnocide.

The so-called progress of the modern world is slowly killing them because of the projects that are proposed by Belo Monte. They are gradually losing all they have – their culture, tradition, language as well as food. Any organizations are supporting the Arawete in their fight for their land and ethnicity including Xingu Vivo and ISA.

The photographs shared by Kohler are breathtaking and truly shows how beautiful the untouched lives of the people. In your own way, you can raise awareness in other issues in your local area through photographs which can be displayed in cheap canvas prints.